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Gene Transfer Technology For HIV Vaccine

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A research team may have broken the stubborn impasse that has frustrated the invention of an effective HIV vaccine, by using an approach that bypasses the usual path followed by vaccine developers. By using gene transfer technology that produces molecules that block infection, the scientists protected monkeys from infection by a virus closely related to HIV—the simian immunodeficiency virus, or SIV—that causes AIDS in rhesus monkeys.

gene transfer technology

“We used a leapfrog strategy, bypassing the natural immune system response that was the target of all previous HIV and SIV vaccine candidates,” said study leader Philip R. Johnson, M.D., chief scientific officer at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Johnson developed the novel approach over a ten-year period, collaborating with K. Reed Clark, Ph.D., a molecular virologist at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio.

Johnson cautioned that many hurdles remain before the technique used in this animal study might be translated into an HIV vaccine for humans. If the technique leads to an effective HIV vaccine, such a vaccine may be years away from realization.

Most attempts at developing an HIV vaccine have used substances aimed at stimulating the body’s immune system to produce antibodies or killer cells that would eliminate the virus before or after it infected cells in the body. However, clinical trials have been disappointing. HIV vaccines have not elicited protective immune responses, just as the body fails on its own to produce an effective response against HIV during natural HIV infection.

The approach taken in the current study was divided into two phases. In the first phase, the research team created antibody-like proteins (called immunoadhesins) that were specifically designed to bind to SIV and block it from infecting cells. Once proven to work against SIV in the laboratory, DNA representing SIV-specific immunoadhesins was engineered into a carrier virus designed to deliver the DNA to monkeys. The researchers chose adeno-associated virus (AAV) as the carrier virus because it is a very effective way to insert DNA into the cells of a monkey or human.

In the second part of the study, the team injected AAV carriers into the muscles of monkeys, where the imported DNA produced immunoadhesins that entered the blood circulation. One month after administration of the AAV carriers, the immunized monkeys were injected with live, AIDS-causing SIV. The majority of the immunized monkeys were completely protected from SIV infection, and all were protected from AIDS. In contrast, a group of unimmunized monkeys were all infected by SIV, and two-thirds died of AIDS complications. High concentrations of the SIV-specific immunoadhesins remained in the blood for over a year.

Further studies need to be conducted if this technique is to become an actual preventive measure against HIV infection in people, Johnson said. “To ultimately succeed, more and better molecules that work against HIV, including human monoclonal antibodies, will be needed,” he and his co-authors conclude. Finally, added Johnson, their approach may also have potential use in preventing other infectious diseases, such as malaria.

Grants from the National Institute of Allergic and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health supported this study. Johnson’s collaborators, in addition to Clark, were Jianchao Zhang, of Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, Ohio; Eloisa Yuste and Ronald C. Desrosiers of the New England Primate Research Center and Harvard Medical School; and Bruce C. Schnepp, Mary J. Connell, and Sean M. Greene, of Children’s Hospital and the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Johnson also is on the University of Pennsylvania faculty.

Nature Medicine, May 17, 2009 Published online: 17 May 2009 DOI: 10.1038/nm.1967
Vector-mediated gene transfer engenders long-lived neutralizing activity and protection against SIV infection in monkeys.
Philip R Johnson, Bruce C Schnepp, Jianchao Zhang, Mary J Connell, Sean M Greene, Eloisa Yuste, Ronald C Desrosiers & K Reed Clark.

The key to an effective HIV vaccine is development of an immunogen that elicits persisting antibodies with broad neutralizing activity against field strains of the virus. Unfortunately, very little progress has been made in finding or designing such immunogens. Using the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) model, we have taken a markedly different approach: delivery to muscle of an adeno-associated virus gene transfer vector expressing antibodies or antibody-like immunoadhesins having predetermined SIV specificity. With this approach, SIV-specific molecules are endogenously synthesized in myofibers and passively distributed to the circulatory system. Using such an approach in monkeys, we have now generated long-lasting neutralizing activity in serum and have observed complete protection against intravenous challenge with virulent SIV. In essence, this strategy bypasses the adaptive immune system and holds considerable promise as a unique approach to an effective HIV vaccine.

Written by huehueteotl

May 19, 2009 at 7:47 am

Posted in HIV

7 Responses

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  1. Занятно пишете, жизненно. Все-таки, для того, чтобы делать по-настоящему интересный блог, нужно не только сообщать о чем-то, но и делать это в интересной форме:)

    Cederash

    May 23, 2009 at 11:28 pm

  2. Красавчег! Пиши исчё!

    Ferinannnd

    May 24, 2009 at 8:34 pm

  3. Занимательная интересная статья Да и в отличие от большинства других подобных советов воду в уши не льешь

    Avertedd

    May 26, 2009 at 9:48 am

  4. HIV is a biggest threat nowadays.Gene transfer technology seems to be quite good and i hope it will be helpful in future.For people who are checking out updates for HIV vaccine, I just came across something on this website.http://www.mynetpharma.com/hiv-vaccine-a-reality-in-future.html

    mynetpharma

    November 10, 2010 at 7:58 am

  5. Hello,
    Really great information found here… Thanks! Gene Transfer Technology For HIV Vaccine HIV is a biggest threat nowadays.Gene transfer technology seems to be quite good and i hope it will be helpful in future.For people who are checking out updates for HIV vaccine, I just came across something on this….
    Thanks and Regards,
    Sam Woods, NY

    raymeds

    February 1, 2011 at 1:34 pm

  6. Hey,I think you have written a great thoughts..This is the very interesting article plotted here..Good post.

    Astermeds

    May 11, 2011 at 8:49 am

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