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For Weight Control You Will Need To Walk More Than 10,000 Steps A Day

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A collaborative study involving 14 researchers from the U.S., Australia, Canada, France, and Sweden has established preliminary guidelines for how many steps per day people should accumulate for weight control.

“We have put together recommendations for different age groups, but the material is more robust when it comes to women,” says Anders Raustorp, University of Kalmar, one of those taking the initiative for the study and director of the Swedish component. For women up to the age of 50 and for men, 10,000 steps a day is not sufficient for weight control.

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The researchers have used the same pedometer, Yamax/KeepWalking LS2000, and identical methods in the various countries for determining the Body Mass Index (BMI). A group of 3,127 healthy adults, 19–94 years of age, with a mean age of 47, including 976 men, participated in the study. The research team has previously published recommendations for children aged 6–12 establishing that girls should accumulate 12,000 steps and boys 15,000 steps every day.

Anders Raustorp has done pioneering work when it comes to introducing the pedometer in Swedish research and Swedish public health efforts. One acclaimed study last autumn showed that if individuals set up goals and keep a journal for successive increases, their activity rises by 27% over a four-month period compared with a control group. Setting targets is thus a key to success.

The targets are based on recommendations developed by high-quality pedometers. Anders Raustorp emphasizes the importance of using validity-tested pedometers with no filter function. It is also important to bear in mind that more research is needed for the preliminary recommendations to be regarded as definitive.

The table below shows the steps-per-day recommendations for weight control

Age women – Steps per day

* 18-40 12 000 steps per day
* 40-50 11 000
* 50-60 10 000
* 60- 8 000

Age men – Steps per day

* 18-50 12 000
* 50- 11 000

JPAH, 5(Supplement 1), January 2008, Copyright © 2008

BMI-Referenced Cut Points for Pedometer-Determined Steps per Day in Adults

C. Tudor-Locke, D.R. Bassett, Jr., W.J. Rutherford, B.E. Ainsworth, C.B. Chan, K. Croteau, B. Giles-Corti, G. Le Masurier, K. Moreau, J. Mrozek, J.-M. Oppert, A. Raustorp, S.J. Strath, D. Thompson, M.C. Whitt-Glover, B. Wilde, J.R. Wojcik
Full Article Table of Contents for Vol. 5, Iss. Supplement 1

Abstract
Background: The goal of this study was to establish preliminary criterion-referenced cut points for adult pedometer-determined physical activity (PA) related to weight status defined by body mass index (BMI). Methods: Researchers contributed directly measured BMI and pedometer data that had been collected (1) using a Yamax-manufactured pedometer, (2) for a minimum of 3 days, (3) on ostensibly healthy adults. The contrasting groups method was used to identify age- and gender-specific cut points for steps/d related to BMI cut points for normal weight and overweight/obesity (defined as BMI <25 and ³25 kg/m2, respectively). Results: Data included 3127 individuals age 18 to 94 years (976 men, age = 46.8 ± 15.4 years, BMI = 27.3 ± 4.9; 2151 women, age = 47.4 ± 14.9 years, BMI = 27.6 ± 6.4; all gender differences NS). Best estimated cut points for normal versus overweight/obesity ranged from 11,000 to 12,000 steps/d for men and 8000 to 12,000 steps/d for women (consistently higher for younger age groups). Conclusions: These steps/d cut points can be used to identify individuals at risk, or the proportion of adults achieving or falling short of set cut points can be reported and compared between populations. Cut points can also be used to set intervention goals, and they can be referred to when evaluating program impact, as well as environmental and policy changes.

Written by huehueteotl

January 13, 2008 at 5:47 pm

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